Clover White Marking Pen Love

Clover White Marking Pen review: Keep It or Bin It? I’ve blathered on about the Clover White Marking Pen before, but it bears repeating, especially after my “A-Ha” moment” the other day. This is why the White Marking Pen (Fine) from Clover rocks:

White marking pen mistakes

No, you’re not seeing double, I marked the first set of lines through the stencil on the border of this quilt, and it was in the wrong place, so I marked over it, figuring I’d be able to remember which lines were the right ones later. Yeah, right. And there were other parts of the marking on this quilt that were much worse, with so many lines and marks that it was likely to be impossible to figure out where to machine quilt when the time came.

But wait! I’d temporarily forgotten that you can use the iron to make the marks disappear:

White marking pen mistakes

Ah-la-peanutbuttersandwiches and A-Ha! A quick pass with the iron, and the marks were gone, and I could re-mark the lines in the proper place. This makes fitting continuous line borders easier too, since you can start at the corners and mark your way along, guestimating as you go how it will all fit together in the middle, and if you need to, you can erase a bit of it and remark it to make it fit better in the end.

And while the Clover White Marking Pen is ideal for really dark fabrics like this black Bali batik, I’ve used it successfully on even medium value printed fabrics, when nothing else would do. The ink is delivered via a roller ball like a Gelly Roll pen, and marking lightly is best. Also note that the ink is virtually invisible until it starts to dry, and will become fully white and opaque when completely dry. The white ink sits on top of the fabric a bit, so that it’s easier to see under the sewing machine lamp. It’s become my go-to marker when I’m faced with a difficult marking task.

It is a bit expensive, selling for around $6.50 per pen in shops, and to be honest, I sometimes marvel at how fast the ink in the pen disappears, but it’s so worth it when no other marker in the arsenal is up to snuff. You can find it cheaper if you scout the Internet a bit, and buy in multiples so that the shipping costs per pen are cut down.

Definitely a Keep It notion in my book! If you’ve used it, share your experiences, good or bad, here!

9 thoughts on “Clover White Marking Pen Love

  1. You’ve completely SOLD me. Where can I get it, and do they sell them here in Germany (locally) or should I start scouting the internet?
    (It was the ah-ha and peanutbutter sandwiches that got me!)

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  2. LOL! I didn’t know you liked peanut butter sandwiches! I like mine toasted with jelly or jam… 🙂

    Good luck getting these pens at the Goose, I’ve asked them to order them repeatedly with no success. I ordered them last from Quilting Warehouse, I think, though they aren’t much cheaper there. I did find them a bit cheaper somewhere else, but sadly, I can’t remember where anymore. They do have them at the Heidelberg shop, but they’re $$!

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  3. I love this pen – have used it for years and think it is great. However, once in a while, it will leave a shadow of the line on the fabric if you erase it with the iron. Not much of a problem on most quilts unless you are doing one for show and being really picky. As always, test first on a scrap of the fabric you are using.

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  4. Hi Ann, and Welcome! I’ve never noticed this happening (and I’m always pretty picky, even when I’m not quilting for show!), but to be honest, it’s only just recently that I’ve removed it with the iron. For all the years that I’ve used this pen, I’ve always just washed it out the same way I do with the blue washout marker–cold clear water, with no soap.

    Do you find that the “shadow” marks go away after washing, or are they there permanently?

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  5. Hmm… good question. I preshrink all my fabric, and when I’m done with a quilt I block I – sometimes twice (before and after binding) but while the quilt is thoroughly wet for that process, I don’t wash it (i.e. with soap or detergent). In one instance, the marks were still there after blocking. The quilt was a gift so I don’t know. It really happens very rarely – usually on a medium toned, fairly solid print. I have wondered if the pen is wax based (or something similar) and the shadow mark seems to be faint darker line, like a waxy leftover.

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  6. I love that tool, too. Never could live any longer without. I used it to mark the sewing lines of the 39 of my 3 (no joke) Moon Glow Star blocks. That means it took me about 4 pens…
    But I found an addition this year at the Elsaß quilt show – it’s a pencil from BOHIN with flexible colors to use (white, turqoise, yellow, pink). The quality is great, too and it stays thin, too.

    Nadine (the other *smile*)

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  7. I love this pen as well, and have had some trouble finding it. I was so excited when a LQS (but not my usual store) had it yesterday!

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  8. I need a white fabric marking pen. I need to trace a pattern onto dark fabric. Do you think this will be the pen to use and if so how do I order one?
    Thanks for any help you can give me
    Lynda

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    1. You could try this pen, certainly, but of course test it on your fabric before using it on your quilt top! You can try ordering from Quilting Warehouse (link above in my previous comment) or searching the Internet for Clover White Marking Pen. Good luck!

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